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Mar 09

Eto Street erased, World War II week by week

Telegram-Tribune March 3, 1942 Java under attack.

Eto street was officially erased from the city map. Apparently the 1941 era City of San Luis Obispo felt that the war effort was hampered by having a Japanese surname on the rolls. It was renamed Brook Street in early March 1942.

The name would not be changed back at the end of the war but in May 9, 2002 Eto Park was finished in memory of Tameji Eto, farmer and leader in the Japanese community and is located on Brook Street.
Though they were guilty of no crime the Japanese community pledged cooperation with military officials charged with removing them from the coastal areas.
Lt. Gen. John L. DeWitt drew the boundaries and local representatives of the Japanese American Citizens league James Nakamura and Karl Taku issued a public plan that “the greater our cooperation with the government, can be expected that the greater will their cooperation with us in the solution of our problems.”
The city council also banned loud juke boxes and worried about steel for the new sewer plant. The new plant was needed with the influx of population at the military bases.
March tire quotas were listed on the front page. The entire county was alloted 38 passenger tires, 32 passenger tubes, 177 truck tires, 199 truck tubes and 76 truck and bus retread tires.
The county board of supervisors agreed to initiate condemnation proceedings to build the airport. They wanted to hurry the process along even though a price had been agreed upon by all parties. The six parcels could then be handed over the the federal authorities for construction. The City of San Luis Obispo contributed $5,000 to the expected $35,000-40,000 cost. The only objection came from the supervisor from Paso Robles E.E. Kleck who said that army officials told him they planned to build two north county airports.
Cal Poly had a problem. The then all male school had women on the way. The up to 24 women enrolled in a aircraft mechanics program. The program included aircraft radio repair, aircraft engines and sheet metal repair.

Eto street was officially erased from the city map. Apparently the 1941 era City of San Luis Obispo felt that the war effort was hampered by having a Japanese surname on the rolls. It was renamed Brook Street in early March 1942.The name would not be changed back at the end of the war but in May 9, 2002 Eto Park was finished in memory of Tameji Eto, farmer and leader in the Japanese community and is located on Brook Street.Though they were guilty of no crime the Japanese community pledged cooperation with military officials charged with removing them from the coastal areas.Lt. Gen. John L. DeWitt drew the boundaries and local representatives of the Japanese American Citizens league James Nakamura and Karl Taku issued a public plan that “the greater our cooperation with the government, can be expected that the greater will their cooperation with us in the solution of our problems.”The city council also banned loud juke boxes and worried about steel for the new sewer plant. The new plant was needed with the influx of population at the military bases.March tire quotas were listed on the front page. The entire county was alloted 38 passenger tires, 32 passenger tubes, 177 truck tires, 199 truck tubes and 76 truck and bus retread tires.The county board of supervisors agreed to initiate condemnation proceedings to build the airport. They wanted to hurry the process along even though a price had been agreed upon by all parties. The six parcels could then be handed over the the federal authorities for construction. The City of San Luis Obispo contributed $5,000 to the expected $35,000-40,000 cost. The only objection came from the supervisor from Paso Robles E.E. Kleck who said that army officials told him they planned to build two north county airports.Cal Poly had a problem. The then all male school had women on the way. The up to 24 women enrolled in a aircraft mechanics program. The program included aircraft radio repair, aircraft engines and sheet metal repair.

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