«

»

Mar 30

Panama Pacific International Exposition, July 4, 1915 San Francisco, The Leonard collection

The 43-story tall Tower of Jewels at the Panama Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco was decorated with 102,000 cut glass Novagems. ©The Tribune/The Leonard collection

It was San Francisco’s grand coming out party.

The City had been ravaged by the Great 1906 Earthquake and Fire. Over 3,000 lives had been lost and as many as ten times that number were left homeless out of a population of about 410,000.

A mere nine years later, three of which were used to build it, the Panama Pacific International Exposition opened. It was a celebration of the completion of the Panama Canal, an amusement park, technology showcase and an assertion that the West could rival the East when it came to putting on an international exposition.
A giant Underwood typewriter clacked out the day’s headlines, visitors could ride in a biplane, visit the Liberty Bell (on loan from Philadelphia) and visit the Palace of Varied Industries or Mines and Metallurgy Palace.

The tallest building was the 435 foot tall Tower of Jewels. Decorated with 102,000 Novagems—colorful cut glass — the building would shimmer in the coastal breeze. The tower was at the main entrance on Scott Street between the Presido and Fort Mason.

It looks like some of these photos were made during a July 4th parade. Men in top hats sit in the back of a convertible car, Stars and Stripes line the streets. Parade watchers look out over the Owl Drug Store and the Hotel Corona.

One float appears to carry the Liberty Bell above a floral flag and escorted by policemen in white gloves.

Riflemen in dress uniforms march down the street though I am not clear if these are Marines or Army. Perhaps a better student of formal dress uniforms can help out with a comment.

The fair ran from February 20th to December 4th 1915.
The Palace of Fine Arts is the only remaining building.

These images come from a collection of large format negatives in the Tribune library. They were  enclosed in a 1950s era Telegram-Tribune window envelope, labeled “Mrs. Leonard.”

The images however are decades older.
How old?

The Liberty Bell was loaned to San Francisco for the Pacific International Exposition in 1915. ©The Tribune/Leonard collection

Two of the collection’s fourteen images are of the Santa Manuela school where Lopez Lake is today. That school building was constructed in 1901 and in the photos the site looks established but still relatively new. Only one  image in the collection is dated, 1908, another is from the Arroyo Grande flood of 1914 and one is of an early century baseball team.
It was San Francisco’s grand coming out party. The City had been ravaged by the Great 1906 Earthquake and Fire. Over 3,000 lives had been lost and as many as ten times that number were left homeless out of a population of about 410,000. A mere nine years later, three of which were used to build it, the Panama Pacific International Exposition opened. It was a celebration of the completion of the Panama Canal, an amusement park, technology showcase and an assertion that the West could rival the East when it came to putting on an international exposition.
A giant Underwood typewriter clacked out the day’s headlines, visitors could ride in a biplane, visit the Liberty Bell (on loan from Philadelphia) and visit the Palace of Varied Industries or Mines and Metallurgy Palace. The tallest building was the 435 foot tall Tower of Jewels. Decorated with 102,000 Novagems—colorful cut glass — the building would shimmer in the coastal breeze. The tower was at the main entrance on Scott Street between the Presido and Fort Mason.

1915 Parade in San Francisco, looks to be a patriotic July 4th celebration. ©The Tribune/The Leonard Collection

It looks like some of these photos were made during a July 4th parade. Men in top hats sit in the back of a convertible car, Stars and Stripes line the streets. Parade watchers look out over the Owl Drug Store and the Hotel Corona. One float appears to carry the Liberty Bell above a floral flag and escorted by policemen in white gloves.Riflemen in dress uniforms march down the street though I am not clear if these are Marines or Army. Perhaps a better student of formal dress uniforms can help out with a comment.The fair ran from February 20th to December 4th 1915.The Palace of Fine Arts is the only remaining building.

The images come from a collection of large format negatives in the Tribune library. They were  enclosed in a 1950s era Telegram-Tribune window envelope, labeled “Mrs. Leonard.” The images however are decades older.

How old?

Two of the collection’s fourteen images are of the Santa Manuela school where Lopez Lake is today. That school building was constructed in 1901 and in the photos the site looks established but still relatively new. Only one  image in the collection is dated, 1908, another is from the Arroyo Grande flood of 1914 and one is of an early century baseball team.

Uniformed riflemen march in San Fransisco in what looks to be a July 4, 1915 parade during the time of the Pacific International Expostition. ©The Tribune/The Leonard Collection

Related posts:

  1. Mrs. B in her parlor 1908, the Leonard Collection
  2. The 1914 flood in Arroyo Grande, the Leonard Collection
  3. Dunnigan’s Grammar School Baseball Nine, Leonard collection
  4. Pismo Beach Fashion 1900s, Leonard collection
  5. High school exercises, the Leonard Collection