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Nov 25

Liquor regulations and prostitution, World War II week by week

A recent unsolved murder and the arrival of thousands of troops to burgeoning camps the area forced the region to enact new restrictions on alcohol sales. The region was taking on a boom-town personality and it appears that prostitution was becoming a major issue; three of the five regulations addressed the topic. The story was on the front page of the Telegram-Tribune November 19, 1942:

Nov. 19, 1942 headlines in the Telegram-Tribune included allied advances in North Africa and a food poisioning at a mental health facility in Oregon. Tainted frozen egg yolks appeared to be the cause.

Will Close Bars at Midnight
New regulations affecting every liquor establishment in his entire district, including midnight closing, were announced today by Commissioner George R. Reilly, member of the State Board of Equalization for the district including San Luis Obispo, San Benito, Monterey, Santa Cruz, Santa Clara, San Mateo and San Francisco counties.
The new regulations decided upon after conferences with army and navy officials include a five point program to become effective Dec. 1.
1. One sales places where liquor is sold by the drink will no longer be open from 6 a.m. to 2 a.m., but will open after Dec. 1 at 10 a.m. and close promptly at midnight.
2. Stores where liquor is bought only in packages will be open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., instead of from 6 a.m. to 2 a.m.
3. Unescorted women no longer will be served at the bar but will receive service only at tables.
4. No liquor will be served in any bar where children are present.
5. Known and suspected prostitutes will be banned at all times from all places.
Commissioner Reilly said that adoption of the new regulations would be voluntary but that refusal to cooperate would bring drastic action.

In other local news, butter would be rationed as local production at local creameries had fallen almost 50 percent since last year. The war effort had depleted the number of milkers. War industries paid better, siphoning away workers and the draft also played a role.

Related posts:

  1. Wartime prostitution, World War II week by week
  2. Segregation in San Luis Obispo, World War II week by week
  3. Japanese internment announced World War II week by week
  4. America invades North Africa, World War II week by week
  5. Dairy workers in short supply, World War II week by week