Category Archive: 1970s

Jul 10

Honoring Dr. Louis Tedone

Dr. Louis Tedone, 83, will recieve the first Louis Tedone Humanitarian award next week from French Hospital for his 45 years of serving the community as a pediatrician and volunteer. 
©The Tribune/ Aaron Lambert

Dr. Louis Tedone will be honored this evening, July 9, 2013 at Mission San Luis Obispo Parish Hall. Tribune reporter Sarah Arnquist wrote this story published Sept. 10, 2006: ‘LUCKY LOUIE’ IS COMMUNITY’S FORTUNE TO HONOR HIS DECADES OF SERVICE, FRENCH HOSPITAL CREATED THE LOUIS TEDONE HUMANITARIAN AWARD Few people have touched as many lives …

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Jun 04

Museum of printing, Shakespeare Press Museum at Cal Poly

ARMSTRONG POWER — Co-curator Emerson Hunt, a junior from Covina, turns the crank of the 90 year old Campbell cylinder press as Paiva feeds the paper. The press came 'round the Horn, was used by a San Francisco newspaper before the earthquake.
© The Tribune Wayne Nicholls

Johannes Gutenberg’s 15th century printing of the bible is a masterpiece, the first book published in volume, but he was a business failure. The genius German goldsmith, inventor of the Gutenberg press went into debt and an argument with his business partner doomed the venture. According to the NPR radio show Planet Money, other printers …

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May 17

Cuesta College builds a campus

Cuesta College was moving to new buildings in 1976 after  early years in World War II surplus buildings.

Cuesta College celebrates 50 years this year and the first major milestone was when voters approved bonds to finance building a brand new facility to replace the 30-year-old wood frame military barracks. This story is from June 5, 1976. Story by Kay Ready Buildings—once whitewashed enlisted men’s quarters for Camp San Luis Obispo, now paint-chipped …

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May 01

Origins of Halcyon, CA and Temple of the People

spherical triangle design of Temple of People has religious significance in Theosophy.

Paul Ivey will deliver a presentation based on his book “Radiance from Halcyon” a history of the Temple of the People. The program will take place Friday May 3 at 6 p.m. Meet at the IOOF Hall in Arroyo Grande at 128 Bridge Street (across from McLintock’s). Admission is free with a donation request in …

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Apr 29

Summertime living, backyard furniture

Essential spring and summer items from an August 1974 advertisement.

Now that spring seems to be on the way it may be time to pick up some back yard furniture. A folding grill for less than $4.00, three different kinds of pools, priced from $3.77 to $88. Time to head to Grants and pick up what appear to be essential and long lasting items. Grant …

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Apr 16

Hearst Castle bombing by New World Liberation Front 1976

Investigators crunch through debris on veranda at Hearst Castle's Casa del Sol guest house, where bomb exploded Thursday (near center of photo.) 02-12-1976 ©The Tribune/Wayne Nicholls

A cowardly man with large ambition, weak ability and a large pile of explosives — stop me if you have heard this story before. It is almost always a man responsible. The story is more common than we care to admit. They slither out from under rocks every few decades, from anarchists in the 19th …

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Apr 03

Where have all the flowers gone?

The World War I field artillery piece in front of San Luis Obispo's Veterans Memorial Building on Grand Avenue had an unusually pacific look today—garlands of posies, including one hibiscus bloom right smack in the blooming muzzle. Published July 12, 1973.
Wayne Nicholls, Telegram-Tribune

See caption correction below in the comments…

Mar 01

SLO Uncovered – Pirate’s Cove, the naked truth about the origin of a nude beach

Pirate's Cove became known as a nude beach in the early 1970s.

Originally all the beaches in the county were clothing optional. According to the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, traditional Chumash garb was a two-piece skirt for women and perhaps a belt for men. Then along came the Spanish friars and beach attire became more modest. When did Pirate’s Cove become the Mecca for nude …

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Feb 06

Demolition and partial reconstruction of the Murray Adobe

The original  plan was to restore the Murray Adobe and open it as a museum. This rendering was circulated in January 1972.

In an Elliot Curry bylined story from March 7, 1967 the shape of Mission Plaza was under debate. The mayor, Clell Whelchel, was skeptical about closing Monterey Street. He wanted to use gas tax funds and keep the street open. Would the Murray adobe become victim of a street-widening proposal? Loren Nicholson, president of the …

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Feb 02

Murray Adobe in Mission Plaza

The first edition of the Tribune was printed here August 7, 1869. The Murray Adobe is much smaller than it was a few years earlier. The subject of the next posting.
©Wayne Nicholls/Telegram-Tribune Nov. 20, 1973

The previous two posts showed what the in the 1960s. By 1973 only the lean-to portion remained, the main house replaced by an arbor. What happened? The answer next week. By now you may recognize the building as the Murray Adobe, law office of Tribune founding editor Walter Murray. It is in Mission Plaza between …

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